Epilepsy may qualify for SSDI benefits.For epileptics whose condition hasn't responded to treatment, convulsive or non-convulsive seizures—as well as fatigue, headache, aphasia, confusion, and other symptoms that can precede or follow these episodes—can be debilitating. Depending on how frequently you experience seizures and how long it takes you to recover from them, holding a job and maintaining substantially gainful employment can be extremely difficult, if not impossible.

Fortunately, if you're no longer able to work as a result of uncontrolled epilepsy, you may be eligible for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits. The Social Security Administration (SSA) Blue Book of qualifying conditions includes listings for epilepsy with and without convulsive seizures. You may be able to collect benefits if you experience daytime seizures or nighttime seizures that make it hard for you to concentrate, think clearly, or stay awake the following day—despite closely following the treatment plan prescribed by your doctor.

Even if your epilepsy doesn't exactly match the Blue Book listing, you may still qualify for SSDI benefits through a residual functional capacity (RFC) analysis. This process allows you, your doctors, and others who know you well to complete forms describing how your condition affects your ability to perform daily tasks.

We Can Help You Apply for Benefits

Are you ready to apply for SSDI benefits? More than two-thirds of applicants are denied in the initial stage, often due to mistakes in the application or a lack of supporting medical documentation. Don't let this happen to you. There's far too much at stake to go it alone. Working with a knowledgeable and experienced Social Security disability attorney can increase your chances of approval and ensure you have skilled legal counsel in your corner throughout the application process.

At O'Connor Law PLLC, our seasoned attorneys help disabled individuals secure the SSDI benefits they deserve. Find out how we can help you obtain benefits for debilitating epilepsy. Contact us today to schedule an appointment for a free initial consultation.

 

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