You don't necessarily need a permanent disability for SSDI.No, though this is a common misconception about Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) eligibility. In order to qualify for SSDI benefits, your disabling medical condition doesn't have to be permanent; it just needs to have lasted, or be expected to last, for at least 12 months or be considered terminal. Additionally, you don't have to wait to apply for SSDI benefits until you've had the disabling condition for a year. You can start the lengthy application process as soon as the doctor treating you says that your disability will continue for a year or longer, or result in death.

Unfortunately, the SSDI application process isn't just lengthy. It's also complex, confusing, and rife with potential pitfalls—so much so that roughly two-thirds of applicants have their claim denied in the initial stage. This doesn't have to happen to you. At O'Connor Law PLLC, our accomplished New York Social Security attorneys help individuals with temporary or permanent disabilities navigate the application process and get the much-needed benefits they deserve.

Considering applying for SSDI without a permanent disability? Having robust medical evidence that shows that your condition prevents substantial gainful employment is essential to the outcome of your claim. We'll assist you with your application and work with your medical providers to gather the required supporting evidence. Let us handle your SSDI case from start to finish so that you can focus on what matters most: getting better.

Talk to an Adept New York Social Security Attorney About Your SSDI Claim

Though not all total disabilities are permanent in nature, in some cases, they can still leave you in pain and out of work for years. Sound familiar? If so, you may qualify for SSDI benefits. 

Our team of dedicated Social Security disability attorneys can help you understand your legal rights and options. Contact us today to schedule an appointment for a free initial consultation to discuss the details of your claim.